All threads / Need help started to learn JS

Ask A Question

Notifications

You’re not receiving notifications from this thread.

Need help started to learn JS

Van Roach asked in Javascript

Hello everyone,,
After learning the basics of the languages I listed above, I decided to try and expand my knowledge of web development. When I started doing my research I was just overwhelmed by the vast amount of.. Stuff.
Angular? Rust? SQL? PHP? Node? React? Bash? Ruby? What the fuck?
What are any of these? Where do I start? Why are there so many? What else am I missing? How can I possibly learn all of this? Seriously... what?

Hello everyone,,
After learning the basics of the languages I listed above, I decided to try and expand my knowledge of web development. When I started doing my research I was just overwhelmed by the vast amount of.. Stuff.
Angular? Rust? SQL? PHP? Node? React? Bash? Ruby? What the fuck?
What are any of these? Where do I start? Why are there so many? What else am I missing? How can I possibly learn all of this? Seriously... what?
thanks for help finallly i get java script course at youtube and it help me a lot https://autoclicker.me

Hi Van Roach, I'm glad that you are working hard. For Web Browser is good to start with HTML and CSS, after that try some codes of Java Script, like when the user go to complete a form, you can validate with Java Script if the input is empty or the text are just numbers. After that you can link with the Data Base with SQL, so learning the Basic of SQL, create a DB, and start put some data. With that you make the three steps, the frontend with HTML e CSS, the backend with Java Script and the Data Base with SQL. For the frontend you can start learn how make your site responsive with Bootstrap, and make your site more beautiful visually. After that you can an Angular, React, Jquery to improve your backend !

If you're new to web development, I think learning how to build static pages is a great way to start. Start with building a basic Portfolio site with html/css and write some vanilla Javascript to improve the site's user interaction. Maybe build a mini tic-tac-toe game for your users to play.

The important thing here is to get yourself familiar with how Javascript actually works, how browsers work, understand the DOM and the interaction between Javascript and the DOM. After that, you can try integrating Bootstrap css and Javascript. Here you will learn about how loading priority works, how to use libraries in HTML, and learn some nifty libraries like jQuery, Popper.js and Bootstrap itself. You can also start learning how to use API. Try integrating your website with a Unsplash's free API, and see how you can load 3rd party's content dynamically.

When you finish the above, you'd have a good feel of how webpages work and can make a decision of whether you want to further explore front-end (most likely React/Angular/Vue) or backend (I recommending picking 1 and spend a few months to be familiar with it).

The reason I don't think a new web developer should jump straight into the fancy things like React/Vue/Angular is that they are essentially very heavy wrapper on top of your regular Javascript. When you start in a library or framework like that, instead of trying the vanilla way, you miss out a lot on understanding how things really work. Everything is just magic, and you'd just be following instructions because "the documentation said so" or "stackoverflow said so". An analogy would be you are a mechanic that knows how to identify and replace broken parts, but not actually know how a car or the parts work.

If you do go down the path of backend later, I think it's good to pick one, and be good at it. Eventually you'd want to explore some other languages/frameworks, because they are built on different paradigms, and can introduce perspective into why things are made certain way and how different paradigms differ.

I say explore another backend after you get good at your chosen one mainly because it's just better to be good at one thing than be terrible at 10 different things.

If you do pick a backend, pick something established like Rails (Ruby) or Django (Python) over their "lightweight" siblings like Sinatra or Flask for better future-proofing and just ease of finding learning resource.

You should check out udemy, they have a range of great courses which would cover the topics you want.

As others have said, select a language you want to learn be it Rails or Node.js and work through it. The different languages are just different ways of doing things essentially.

Join the discussion

Want to stay up-to-date with Ruby on Rails?

Join 34,674+ developers who get early access to new tutorials, screencasts, articles, and more.

    We care about the protection of your data. Read our Privacy Policy.

    logo Created with Sketch.

    Ruby on Rails tutorials, guides, and screencasts for web developers learning Ruby, Rails, Javascript, Turbolinks, Stimulus.js, Vue.js, and more. Icons by Icons8

    © 2020 GoRails, LLC. All rights reserved.